Southeastern Washington Autism Conference

 

Wednesday, August 9th

8:30-9:00 AM | Registration & Visit the Vendors

9:00-10:15 AM | Welcome / John Medina, PhD

Keynote: Theory of Mind

10:15-10:30 AM | Break

10:30 AM-12:00 PM | Ellyn Lucas Arwood, EDD, CCC-SLP & Carole Kaulitz, MED, CCC-SLP

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 1: Learning a Brain-Based Process
(All)

10:30 AM-12:00 PM | Michael Whitehead, PHD

The Coercion Paradox: Using the Power of Connection to Reduce Power Struggles
(Families)

12:00-1:00 PM | Lunch (Food Trucks Available)

1:00-2:30 PM | Ellyn Lucas Arwood, EDD, CCC-SLP & Carole Kaulitz, MED, CCC-SLP

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 2: Learning to Think with Language-Based Strategies

(All)

1:00-2:30 PM | Christine Lindgren, MED

Places of Play: Early Identification and Intervention
(Families)

1:00-2:30 PM | Kristin Kawena Begay, PHD, NCSP & Kathryn Holley, MED, BCBA

Adolescence & Puberty
(Families)

2:30-2:45 PM | Break (Food Trucks Available)

2:45-4:15 PM | Ellyn Lucas Arwood, EDD, CCC-SLP & Carole Kaulitz, MED, CCC-SLP

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 3: Language Strategies for Pro-Social Thinking
(All)

2:45-4:15 PM | Rae Catt, OT

Rainbow Play and Mealtime Success
(Families)

2:45-4:15 PM | Kristin Kawena Begay, PHD, NCSP & Kathryn Holley, MED, BCBA

Transitioning Skills into Adulthood
(All)

 

Thursday, August 10th

8:30-9:00 AM | Registration and Visit the Vendors

9:00-10:15 AM | Alexis Wineman, Miss Montana

Keynote: Autism Doesn't Define Me, I Define My Autism!

10:15-10:30 AM | Break

10:30 AM-12:00 PM | Alexis Wineman, Miss Montana

Autism: A Family Diagnosis
(Families)

10:30 AM-12:00 PM | Michael Whitehead, PhD

The Coercion Paradox: Reducing Defiant Behavior Through Connection
(Educators)

10:30 AM-12:00 PM | Becky Gellerson, MA, CRC

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation & Pre-Employment Transition Services
(All)

12:00 - 1:00 PM | Lunch (Food Trucks Available)

1:00-2:30 PM | Rae Catt, OT

Rules, Routine & Rituals: How to Use Them to Your Advantage
(Families)

1:00-2:30 PM | Christine Lindgren, MED

Stretching the Comfort Zone: Making Uncertainty Productive
(All)

1:00-2:30 PM | Kristin Kawena Begay, PHD, NCSP & Kathryn Holley, MED, BCBA

Tips for Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children with ASD
(Educators)

2:30-2:45 PM | Break (Food Trucks Available)

2:45-4:15 PM | Michael Goodwill & Blake Konrady

Provail Transition Services
(All)

2:45-4:15 PM | Christine Lindgren, MED

Using Communication to Build Connections
(All)

2:45-4:15 PM | Kristin Kawena Begay, PHD, NCSP & Kathryn Holley, MED, BCBA

When Once is Not Enough: Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents with ASD
(All)

Keynote Speaker

John Medina, PhD

 Brain Specialist

Keynote: Theory of Mind 9 a.m., Wednesday, August 9

The human brain is hands-down the most used, most complex thinking organ in the known universe – yet most of us have no idea what’s really going on inside our heads. Brain scientists do. They have uncovered facts about how it works every business leader, parent, healthcare professional and teacher should know. Some of these findings are well-known; we know that a stressed brain is less productive, for example, even though we create high-stress office environments. Some facts are less well known, like the need for physical activity to get your brain working at peak levels. Daily exercise is crucial to education as it directs blood flow to the hippocampus where short-term memories become long-term memories – that’s called learning. Astonishing in the light of these facts, schools are replacing gym classes with academic classes. Furthermore, it has been proven that tactics like simple exercise drastically reduces the chances of brain disorders like Alzheimer’s and deep depression. So, why is this? How does it all work, and how does it relate to the real world, from boardroom to classroom? Fortunately we have neuroscientist and popular professor, Dr. John Medina to inform, educate, and even entertain us with his fun, witty, and extremely fascinating presentations. 

Dr. John J. Medina is a developmental molecular biologist focused on the genes involved in human brain development and the genetics of psychiatric disorders. He has spent most of his professional life as a private research consultant, working primarily in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries on research, related to mental health. Medina holds an affiliate faculty appointment at the University Of Washington School Of Medicine, in its Department of Bioengineering. Medina was also the founding director of the Talaris Research Institute, a Seattle-based research center originally focused on how infants encode and process information at the cognitive, cellular` and molecular levels. He has also been appointed to the rank of affiliate scholar at the National Academy of Engineering, and his celebrated book, Brain Rules was not only a New York Times bestseller, it has also become the standard handbook of understanding and improving the brain, which in turn, improves our lives. It has been translated into over 20 languages and is used as a textbook in more than 15 universities across the country, and a recently revised edition was released in 2014, along with Brain Rules for Baby. He is also the author and on-camera presenter in The Great Courses series “Your Best Brain: the Science of Brain Improvement,” which featured 24 lectures describing in-depth the linkage between biology and behavior.

The only thing that rivals John’s genius is his energy. He is a born speaker to whom people of all walks of life flock. So, it’s no wonder he’s been named Outstanding Faculty of the Year at the College of Engineering at the University of Washington; the Merrill Dow/Continuing Medical Education National Teacher of the Year; and, twice, the Bioengineering Student Association Teacher of the Year. And when he speaks, you will understand why he has been named “teacher of the year” more than once. His passion, expertise, and enthusiasm will be obvious to your audience when they see him in action. He always leaves his audience riveted, reeling, and also quite refreshed – as the solutions to seemingly complicated questions become easy to discern after experiencing his presentations.

Medina has a lifelong fascination with how the mind reacts to and organizes information. As the father of two boys, he has an interest in how the brain sciences might influence the way we teach our children. In addition to his research, consulting, and teaching, Medina speaks often to public officials, business and medical professionals, school boards, and nonprofit leaders – giving them the answers they need to some of the most complicated questions of the human mind, and insight into improving our productivity, and personal health. With a light-hearted approach, and an infusion of great energy, Dr. John Medina offers us understanding, and the techniques we should know to relax, and reach our potential, both in our personal and professional lives.

RESUME:

  • Developmental molecular biologist
  • Author: New York Times bestseller, Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School, Brain Rules for Baby, The Genetic Inferno, The Clock of Ages, Depression, What You Need to Know About Alzheimer’s, The Outer Limits of Life, Uncovering the Mystery of AIDS, and Of Serotonin, Dopamine and Antipsychotic Medications
  • Consultant, genetics of psychiatric disorders
  • Affiliate Professor of Bioengineering , University of Washington School of Medicine
  • Founding Director: Talaris Research Institute
  • Awarded: Rank of affiliate scholar at the National Academy of Engineering; Outstanding Faculty of the Year at the College of Engineering at the University of Washington; the Merrill Dow/Continuing Medical Education National Teacher of the Year; and, twice, the Bioengineering Student Association Teacher of the Year
  • Consultant: Education Commission of the States
  • Columnist: "Molecules of the Mind" for Psychiatric Times

Keynote: Theory of Mind 9 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.   Understand the concept of Theory of Mind as it relates to autism.
2.   Discuss the biology of Theory of Mind, from brains to cells and genes.
3.   Explore the success of therapies involved in training Theory of Mind skills to autistic in improving the social skills in autistic populations regardless of age, and discuss the need for much more research.

Keynote Speaker

Alexis Wineman

 Miss Montana

Keynote: Autism Doesn't Define Me, I Define My Autism! 9 a.m., Thursday, August 10
Autism: A Family Diagnosis 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 10

Alexis Wineman’s journey started long before being crowned Miss Montana 2012, and ultimately the "America's Choice" contestant in the 2012 Miss America competition. Diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) at the age of 11, Alexis and her family struggled for years to understand her challenges. Part of that journey included a misdiagnosis and bullying. Fortunately, her family was and continues to be a source of strength and inspiration.

The Miss Montana and Miss America competitions provided Alexis with an opportunity to challenge herself and prove wrong her naysayers who never thought the shy, quiet girl in a hoodie could actually compete on one of the biggest stages in America.

Alexis’ story, as the first contestant with autism in Miss America’s history, made national and international headlines. Through the process, Alexis discovered the power of her voice and how the sash she wore represented more than a state, it represented everyone who wasn’t considered “typical.”

Alexis is completing her final year of college and speaks at conferences and events across the country.

Keynote: Autism Doesn't Define Me, I Define My Autism! 9 a.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
Alexis speaks about growing up as an undiagnosed child and the struggles she and her family experienced during her toddler and elementary school years. She is candid about the bullying she endured, the teachers who were supportive and the environments that didn’t allow her to thrive. Before she was diagnosed as someone on the autism spectrum, she describes how she was misdiagnosed with depression, and urges families to trust their instincts and 'gut feelings'. Her mother, who recently passed, became a strong advocate for Alexis and she encourages parents to develop strong partnerships with school and community resources. Alexis just completed college in May, and is now transitioning into adulthood— "whatever that means," she says with a smile. Be prepared to laugh, cry and cheer as Alexis opens up about how a girl who never left home without her Winnie the Pooh, suddenly found herself on a stage, in a bikini with a country cheering her on.
Objective
To promote acceptance and inclusion of people with autism by providing a real-world example of how with support Alexis accomplished many things she never thought possible—and in fact was told would not be possible.

Autism: A Family Diagnosis 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
Alexis shares how the diagnosis was a relief to her family, and yet a burden for her—just another label, another thing to be called—and how if it wasn't for her siblings and parents she would likely not have graduated high school, let alone received her BA, applied for Miss Montana or learned how to engage. Alexis shares how each sibling played, and continues to play, a certain role on her journey.

Featured Speaker

Ellyn Lucas Arwood, EDD, Apricot Inc.

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 1: Learning a Brain-Based Process 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
SESSION 2: Learning to Think with Language-Based Strategies 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
SESSION 3: Language Strategies for Pro-Social Thinking 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9

Dr. Ellyn Lucas Arwood, a speech-language pathologist, educator, and special educator for the past 35 years. She began working with children with autism in 1972. Shortly after that, she engaged in application research for children who would be diagnosed today as having autism spectrum disabilities. In 1975, she began her doctoral work with a dissertation in speech for children with autism spectrum disabilities, referred to as emotionally disturbed children in that era. Since then she is the author of five textbooks; numerous articles, chapters, and monographs. Dr. Arwood began using drawing with nonverbal students in 1971, developing it into drawn pictures, event-based pictures, cartoons and flowcharts.

Featured Speaker

Carole Kaulitz, MEd, CCC/SLP, Apricot Inc.

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 1: Learning a Brain-Based Process 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
SESSION 2: Learning to Think with Language-Based Strategies 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
SESSION 3: Language Strategies for Pro-Social Thinking 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9

Carole Kaulitz is currently self-employed as a Speech-Language Pathologist/Autism Consultant. She has worked in many public schools systems over the past 32 years in a variety of roles related to working with students with autism spectrum disorders. Her expertise centers on developing a collaboration/consultation communication model for educators working with students with autism spectrum disorders of all ages and language/learning levels with a focus on visual strategies and social communication. Carole has extensive training in multi-methodologies related to autism, and has presented numerous workshops about Visual Learning Systems, Language/Learning Assessments, and Strategies for Learning with a Visual Brain to interested professionals and parents throughout the State of Washington and parts of Oregon and California. Carole lives in Washington State with Don, her husband of 32 years, and her son, David, and daughter, Sarah, who are learning to navigate the adult world.

Learning to Think: Inclusive Brain-Based Language Strategies
SESSION 1: Learning a Brain-Based Process
 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
Description
Many individuals with autism find it challenging to “fit in” to established social norms because they cannot mentally see their future or the impact of their actions. This presentation offers visual language strategies to help students socially integrate into schools. Numerous case examples and student work will be provided to showcase a variety of language strategies that improves pro-social and cognitive thinking while alleviating stress and mental health issues.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.   Explain how neuro-semantic language learning theory provides for a foundation to understanding the influence of thinking on language and language on thinking.
2.   Practice Viconic Language Methods (VLMs) that can be implemented in education to empower individuals on the autism spectrum to make pro-social relationships.
3.   Demonstrate at least two language-based strategies that they can use in their practice to help develop pro-social thinking of those with autism spectrum disorders.
4.   Explain how improving thinking helps eliminate stress and decrease mental health concerns.

SESSION 2: Learning to Think with Language-Based Strategies 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.   Explain how neuro-semantic language learning theory provides for a foundation to understanding the influence of thinking on language and language on thinking.
2.   Practice Viconic Language Methods (VLMs) that can be implemented in education to empower individuals on the autism spectrum to make pro-social relationships.
3.   Demonstrate at least two language-based strategies that they can use in their practice to help develop pro-social thinking of those with autism spectrum disorders.
4.   Explain how improving thinking helps eliminate stress and decrease mental health concerns.

SESSION 3: Language Strategies for Pro-Social Thinking 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Description 
When a person’s thinking level is increased through language-based strategies, the learner has more opportunities for making pro-social choices and for learning more advanced social and academic concepts. Numerous examples of how to use the language-based strategies will be provided for participants to practice.
Objectives 
Participants will be able to:
1.   Understand the influence of language on thinking and why language strategies raise thinking levels.
2.   Identify intervention strategies via examples across levels of ability and function.

Featured Speaker

Michael Whitehead, PhD, Sageview Youth Psychology

The Coercion Paradox: Using the Power of Connection to Reduce Power Struggles 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
The Coercion Paradox: Reducing Defiant Behavior Through Connection 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 10

Michael Whitehead is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He has been practicing family therapy for 10 years, with a special interest in treating children with severe behavioral disturbances. Dr. Whitehead works in Richland, WA conducting family therapy where a child diagnosed with ODD, ADHD, or ASD is present. His main focus is making sure the family as a whole unit functions well. Dr. Whitehead’s passion is helping kids be understood and by their caregivers. He currently lives in the Tri-Cities with his wife and four children, one of which has a dual diagnosis of ADHD and ASD.

The Coercion Paradox: Using the Power of Connection to Reduce Power Struggles 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 9
Description
This presentation will focus on the “coercion cycle” as the key element in the development of defiant and problem behaviors in children.  A description of the “coercion cycle” will be shared along with how it has been shown to change relationships and individuals.  Research on effective interventions in home settings will be shared along with how parents and caregivers can use two key interventions to help reduce the presence of the “coercion cycle”.
NOTE: This presentation is similar to the presentation for professionals; however, the interventions will be different due to the difference in settings.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.   Identify and understand the “coercion cycle”.
2.   Learn how the “coercion cycle” changes relationships and individuals.
3.   Explore research on effective interventions in reducing behavioral problems.
4.   Learn two key interventions at reducing the “coercion cycle” and minimizing problem behaviors.

The Coercion Paradox: Reducing Defiant Behavior Through Connection 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
This presentation will focus on the “coercion cycle” as the key element in the development of defiant and problem behaviors in children.  A description of the “coercion cycle” will be shared along with how it has been shown to change relationships and individuals.  Research on effective interventions in school settings will be shared along with how school staff members can use two key interventions to help reduce the presence of the “coercion cycle”.
NOTE:  This presentation is similar to the presentation for families; however, the interventions will be different due to the difference in settings.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.   Identify and understand the “coercion cycle”.
2.   Learn how the “coercion cycle” changes relationships and individuals.
3.   Explore research on effective interventions in reducing behavioral problems.
4.   Learn two key interventions at reducing the “coercion cycle” and minimizing problem behaviors.

Featured Speaker

Christine Lindgren, MEd, Autism Specialist, Responding to Autism Center

Places of Play: Early Identification and Intervention 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Stretching the Comfort Zone: Making Uncertainty Productive 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Using Communication to Build Connections 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Christine is an Autism Specialist and the Director of the Responding to Autism Center in Kennewick, Washington. As an Autism Specialist for more than 20 years, she helps educate, treat, diagnose, and train professionals, families, children and adults on the autism spectrum. Christine has unique experiences from many perspectives, including: as a teacher to special education students, a consultant to professionals, families, schools, and organizations.

Additionally, as a parent of a disabled child, and having a disability herself, she has a first-hand understanding of how to overcome and persevere the challenges a disability presents. Her passion to help those affected by autism, provides many families with guidance, education, hope and the knowledge that they are not alone. Learn more at Responding to Autism Center. 

Places of Play: Early Identification and Intervention 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Description
Early identification and intervention for children with autism can have a great benefits and a notable impact on a child’s future success.  This workshop will provide guidance for parents and caregivers to engage in goal orientated play actives to promote genuine engagement and improve overall developmental growth.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn how to identify the red flags for autism spectrum disorder.
2.    Learn how to use play to improve communication, joint attention, and emotional connection.

Stretching the Comfort Zone: Making Uncertainty Productive 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
Inability to manage uncertainty in a productive way is a common core deficit for a person on the autism spectrum.  This can often lead to anxiety, withdrawal, disconnection, and other difficult behaviors.  This workshop will provide tools and strategies to stretch and individual’s comfort zone through everyday engagements.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Understand how to use everyday engagements to increase flexibility and stretch the comfort zone. 
2.    Learn how to create opportunities for productive mental challenges.

Using Communication to Build Connections 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
Communication is often referred to as a delicate dance, with partners continually adjusting to stay synchronized and form unique and thoughtful responses.  During the workshop participants will learn strategies to enhance communication, connection, and emotional engagement.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Understand the foundation for building meaningful communication.
2.    Learn how to use communication to improve emotional attunement, perspective sharing, and social referencing.

Featured Speaker

Kristin Kawena Begay, PhD, NCSP, University of Washington Autism Center

Adolescence & Puberty 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Transitioning Skills into Adulthood 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Tips for Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children with ASD 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
When Once is Not Enough: Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents with ASD 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Kawena Begay, PhD, NCSP, is a psychologist at the UW Autism Center. She received her B.A. in Elementary Education from Luther College (Iowa), specializing in Early Childhood and Special Education. She earned her M.Ed. and Ph.D. in School Psychology from the University of Washington. Kawena completed graduate practicum training at UW Autism Center and Seattle Children’s Hospital, and predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at UW Autism Center. Kawena’s research focuses on effective teaching and counseling strategies for children from diverse backgrounds as well as best practices for ASD identification and treatment across different racial and ethnic groups. Kawena works on several research studies at the UW Autism Center and also provides clinical services.

Prior to receiving her doctorate, Kawena taught grades Pre-K through 12 in several different states, including on the Navajo Reservation in New Mexico and in rural Hawai’i at a Hawaiian Immersion school. She has also worked as a K-12 School Counselor in a Hawaiian Immersion school. A Nationally Certified School Psychologist, Kawena served grades Pre-K through 12 as a School Psychologist in both Washington and Hawai’i. She worked to improve identification services and use of culturally appropriate assessment procedures in the schools by providing additional training and consultation for district staff members.

Adolescence & Puberty 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn how adolescence and puberty impacts individuals with ASD.  
2.    Gain strategies for talking about the challenges of adolescences and tips for talking about puberty with individuals with ASD.       

Transitioning Skills into Adulthood 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Understand increasing independence in young adults experiencing ASD.
2.    Gain strategies to transition those skills into adulthood.  
3.    Learn about the Assessment of Functional Living Skills (AFLS) and how to utilize the results to create comprehensive plans to transition into adulthood.      

Tips for Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children with ASD 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn what executive functioning skills are and how they impact day-to-day functioning.
2.    Gain strategies for helping teach executive functioning skills.
3.    Review accommodations for difficulties in executive functioning skills.

When Once is Not Enough: Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents with ASD 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn about OCD and its relationship to anxiety. 
2.    Gain an understanding effective treatment approaches, such as exposure therapy and mindfulness strategies will be reviewed. 
3.    Learn tips to help adolescents with ASD who exhibit OCD behaviors.

 

Featured Speaker

Kathryn Holley, MEd, BCBA, University of Washington Autism Center

Adolescence & Puberty 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Transitioning Skills into Adulthood 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Tips for Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children with ASD 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
When Once is Not Enough: Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents with ASD 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Kathryn Holley is a Behavior and Education Consultant at the UW Autism Center. Kathryn has been working in the field of ABA in Pierce County since 2010. Kathryn started her work as a behavior technician working 1:1 with children and families impacted by Autism and went on to receive her BCaBA and her BCBA. Kathryn has advanced training in Pivotal Response Training and Social Thinking.

Kathryn is passionate about implementing high quality, intensive in home ABA services that include collaboration from patients, their families, and other providers. Kathryn has a special interest in working with teens and young adults.

At the UW Autism Center, Kathryn is supervising intensive in home ABA services and participating on the training team by providing school consultations and group trainings pertaining to ABA and Autism.

Adolescence & Puberty 1 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn how adolescence and puberty impacts individuals with ASD.  
2.    Gain strategies for talking about the challenges of adolescences and tips for talking about puberty with individuals with ASD.       

Transitioning Skills into Adulthood 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Understand increasing independence in young adults experiencing ASD.
2.    Gain strategies to transition those skills into adulthood.  
3.    Learn about the Assessment of Functional Living Skills (AFLS) and how to utilize the results to create comprehensive plans to transition into adulthood.      

Tips for Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children with ASD 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn what executive functioning skills are and how they impact day-to-day functioning.
2.    Gain strategies for helping teach executive functioning skills.
3.    Review accommodations for difficulties in executive functioning skills.

When Once is Not Enough: Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents with ASD 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Learn about OCD and its relationship to anxiety. 
2.    Gain an understanding effective treatment approaches, such as exposure therapy and mindfulness strategies will be reviewed. 
3.    Learn tips to help adolescents with ASD who exhibit OCD behaviors.

Featured Speaker

Rachael Marie Catt, OT, Kadlec Therapy Services

Rainbow Play and Mealtime Success 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Rules, Routine & Rituals: How to Use Them to Your Advantage 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Rachael Marie Catt, better known as Rae, is a Pediatric Occupational Therapist currently working at The Healthplex Kadlec Regional Medical Center’s outpatient therapy clinic.

Rae graduated from the University of Kansas in 2000 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Occupational Therapy. Since graduating Rae has worked steadily in the area of pediatrics focusing on feeding and sensory integration.

Rae took the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test, Sensory integration certification in 2006 from the University of Southern California and Western Psychological Corporation. She has had extensive continuing education in the areas of Neurodevelopmental Therapy, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Developmental Care intervention, feeding preterm and fragile infants, feeding early development and Beckman oral motor approach.

Rae has always had a gift for teaching others, typically focusing on parent/caregiver education and peer support such as other therapists and nurses. Over the past few years, Rae has gotten the opportunity to be a ‘ghost writer’ for the United Way “Birth to Five “Blog and is currently serving as a Feeding Specialist for Holt International where she will be going to the Philippines in July to educate caregivers who work in orphanages who feed kids with disabilities.

Always passionate and excitable about learning and teaching, Rae is looking forward for many more opportunities to educate and share with others how to help themselves and those they love.

Rainbow Play and Mealtime Success 2:45 p.m., Wednesday, August 9
Description
The aim of this presentation is to provide those who love and work with children on the spectrum and struggle with mealtimes an opportunity to look at feeding skills from a new perspective.  
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Understand why play is such an important part of a child’s life and how it relates to feeding.
2.    Review the components used in the Rainbow Play Scale and how the colors work.
3.    Identify a ‘feeder’ in your life and what play level-color they are currently and what we can expect at mealtimes.

Rules, Routine & Rituals: How to Use Them to Your Advantage 1 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Description
The focus of this presentation is to educate caregivers on how to recreate positive expectations for their loved ones and themselves in everyday ways.
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Identify why negative behaviors can be a good thing.
2.    Understand why we let them do what they shouldn’t do and don’t expect them to do anything. 
3.    Understand age level expectations.
4.    Empower your child to be part of the family.  

Featured Speaker

Michael Goodwill, PROVAIL, Seattle

Provail Transition Services 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Michael has worked with people with disabilities since 1990, when he first supported individuals as they moved from state institutions into the community. He has since dedicated his work by working with individuals with various abilities, including years of managing supported employment and residential programs. His continued efforts center on supports to individuals transitioning from school to employment opportunities while supporting families in navigating systems and accessing resources. His strength is customized job development and networking within the business community. Michael is a Board member with Washington APSE and is the Transition Chair for the Community Employment Alliance. Michael’s position as the Manager of Transition Services at PROVAIL allows him to start working with students as they enter into their community as adults, paving their way as equal and contributing citizens.

Provail Transition Services 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Know how to prepare for your student’s last year.
2.    Understand post-secondary options for your student.
3.    Be able to prepare parents and guardians with resources and tips.

 

Featured Speaker

Blake Konrady, Employment Services Manager PROVAIL, Seattle

Provail Transition Services 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10

Blake is a native Washingtonian with a professional background in Education, Environmental Studies, and Guest Services. He has worked in the supported employment realm at PROVAIL for over three years as a job developer and job coach. Blake has partnered on the Microsoft Autism Hiring Initiative in Washington since its inception in 2015 with 29 job placements within the technology industry.

Provail Transition Services 2:45 p.m., Thursday, August 10
Objectives
Participants will be able to:
1.    Know how to prepare for your student’s last year.
2.    Understand post-secondary options for your student.
3.    Be able to prepare parents and guardians with resources and tips.

Featured Speaker

Becky Gellerson, MA, CRC, Regional Transition Consultant

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation & Pre-Employment Transition Services 10:30 a.m., Thursday, August 10

Becky Gellerson is the Regional Transition Consultant for the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation working with Educational Service Districts 123 and 105. She holds a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from Western WA University and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. The goal of her work is to collaborate with school districts and direct teaching staff to serve students with disabilities more effectively as they transition out of high school. Her area of focus is pre-employment transition services; more specifically, self-advocacy, job exploration, workplace readiness, work-based learning experiences, and exploration of post-secondary opportunities. Becky has worked in the area of vocational rehabilitation, both in the private and public sectors, for over eleven years

Mission Statement

Mission: To improve the Quality of Life for those affected by Neurological Disorders.

Purpose: WARMHEARTED SUPPORT: To provide compassion, education, and support to those affected by neurological disorders, and to their caregivers, so they don’t have to face the challenges of a neurological disorder alone.

Values:

  • RESPECT: Do no harm to the dignity and self-esteem of anyone dealing with a neurological disorder.
  • COMPASSION: Treat our clients and potential clients as if they are part of our family.
  • ACCESSIBILITY: Provide access to our services independent of ability to pay.
  • EFFECTIVENESS: Provide timely, current, and useful information about the full spectrum of neurological disorders.

Picture of the Future:

Every person dealing with a neurological disorder in our “area of service” is aware that KNRC is here to help, utilizes our resources, and refers others to us.

Healthday News Article

Staff

Karen Hayes, M.A., Executive Director

Karen has been the Executive Director of Kadlec Neurological Resource Center since May, 2005. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Science from Washington State University/Tri-Cities and a Master of Arts degree in Applied Behavioral Science from City University/Leadership Institute of Seattle. She is a Washington State Licensed Mental Health Counselor and a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor in Idaho.

Sue Linn, Program Specialist

Sue has been the Program Specialist for Kadlec Neurological Resource Center since October 2009. Sue helps to coordinate our many community events. Prior to joining the KNRC staff, Sue worked for the Washington State House of Representatives as a legislative aide, tracking legislation and assisting constituents with their needs. Sue has a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration from Eastern Washington University. She is a mother of two.

Cathy Manderbach, Outreach Specialist

Cathy joined Kadlec Neurological Resource Center in May of 2013.  She represents KNRC at community and educational events. She assists in developing and strengthening relationships with organizations such as ALS and Alzheimer’s Association.  She organizes new fundraising opportunities while increasing awareness about KNRC’s many resources. Cathy has her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Central Michigan University where she majored in marketing.  

Susan Pinard, Resource Specialist

Susan Pinard joined the KNRC staff as the Resource Specialist in August of 2013.  She had been involved with the KNRC fundraiser, Variété, for many years as an organizer and decorator.  She owned and ran Hullabaloo Event Planning for ten years.  She also worked at The Richland Public Library for three years.  She has a bachelor degree from the University of Washington with majors in Anthropology and American Ethnic Studies.

Learn more about the Neurological Resource Center

 

MethylTetraHydroFolate Reductase (MTHFR)

What is Folate, methylfolate and MTHFR gene?

Folic acid is the man-made form of folate. Folate is a B-vitamin naturally found in some foods and our bodies need it to form healthy cells. For it to do its job, the most common form of folate in supplements and fortified foods must be converted to its active form, methylfolate, to be used by the body. But, not everyone is born equal, as far as methylation is concerned. In fact, as much as 70% (in the US) inherit a defective or partially defective gene that lacks the enzyme needed to convert folate, this is the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The problem lies in the fact that almost half of all people have genetic variations that reduce the ability of the MTHFR enzyme to make this conversion.

Treatment

For people with MTHFR gene variations, supplementing with the already activated form of folate (5-MTHF) is far more effective than introducing the pre-converted form to the body through typical folate supplements. L-Methylfolate (5-MTHF) supplements provide the active form of folate naturally present in the body and available for biological action.

Who is at risk for MTHFR gene problems?

  • Depressed patients are thought to be at risk for MTHFR polymorphisms because would have lower serum L-methylfolate and thus lower CNS folate---thus lower monamine levels (serotonin, dopamine, NE)
  • Hispanic and Italian population
  • All of us...

Conditions that treating methylation has helped 

  • Depression (Deplin)
  • Anxiety (Deplin)
  • Memory Loss (CerefolinNAC)
  • Diabetic neuropathy (MetaNX)
  • High Risk Pregnancies (Neevo, NeevoDHA, Thorne Prenatal)
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Irritable Bowel
  • Migraines
  • Bipolar, Schizophrenia, Parkinson’s
  • Autism, Autism spectrum disorders
  • Prevention of Birth Defects

Learn more from Dr. Neil Rawlins

Summary of Dietary, Nutritional, and Medical Treatments for Autism Article from Arizona State University

Additional MTHFR materials:

Neurotransmitter Archive

Calendar of Events

Ways to Give

Your contributions are absolutely essential in order for our services and resources to be provided free of charge. You make our existence possible—ensuring that now and in the future no one is left alone to deal with a neurological disorder! Donating to Kadlec Neurological Resource Center in another’s name is a meaningful way to honor or remember a very special person.


Become a Champion

KNRC membership is transitioning, and KNRC Members are becoming Champions. KNRC donations are being accepted by Kadlec Foundation and should be designated for KNRC. Your support of KNRC continues to be needed and is greatly appreciated.

Thank you for being a KNRC Champion; you are helping to keep KNRC going strong. If you prefer to make your gift by check, please make checks payable to Kadlec Foundation - For KNRC, and send to our attention at 888 Swift Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352.

Donate to KNRC or make a memorial contribution here.


Fred Meyer Community Rewards Program

You can now link your Fred Meyer Rewards Card to Kadlec Neurological Resource Center. Enroll into the program or sign in to the Fred Meyer Rewards program. Once you are logged in, you can designate KNRC to benefit from your shopping. Simply enter our Fred Meyer non-profit number: 93431. Every time you shop and use your Rewards Card, you are helping KNRC earn a donation. Learn more.


Yoke’s eScript Rewards Program

Kadlec Neurological Resource Center is now enrolled in Yoke’s eScrip rewards program.

What is eScrip?

eScrip has created a system that rewards customer loyalty by contributing a percentage of purchases made by participating non-profit groups or schools.
 
Friends of Kadlec Neurological Resource Center are encouraged to register their grocery club cards. A percentage of all purchases made at eScrip merchants will be given to KNRC. If you don’t already have a card, stop by Yoke's Fresh Market to pick up a card.

How Does eScrip Work?

Yoke’s Fresh Market will contribute up to 5% each time you make a purchase using your registered card. There are no receipts to collect, no vouchers or certificates to buy, no hassles for you and every purchase counts.

To enroll KNRC, visit www.escrip.com

Once you create or login to your existing account, link your eScrip account to KNRC using our Group ID number: 500824413

If you have questions, please contact Cathy Manderbach at (509) 943-8455.


Amazon Smile Program

The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases to the charitable organizations, such as KNRC.  Sign-Up to support KNRC at smile.amazon.com.

Library

Reference Librarian available Monday and Tuesday, 12:00 pm-5:00 pm, Thursday, 12:00 pm–5:00 pm and Friday, 11:00 pm-4:00 pm

Kadlec Neurological Resource Center has an extensive lending library for those interested in many disorders with a special emphasis on neurological disorders. Our library collection includes books, pamphlets, newsletters, DVDs and related materials. Resources for caregivers are a highlight of our library collection. Our children’s collection helps young people with neurological concerns (for themselves, for a sibling, parent, or grandparent) understand that they are not “the only one.”

Search the Library Catalog

Checkout Policies:

Patrons are allowed to check out up to five books, DVDs, or other resource materials at once. Materials can be checked out for one month. Items may renewed if there is no hold on the book. Items can be put on hold if it is not available. Patron will be contacted by phone or email when the item becomes available. Items will be held for two weeks. If held items are not picked up within two weeks, the hold will be cancelled, and the items returned to the shelf.

Newsletter

The NeuroTransmitter provides current neurological and related health information. Each issue includes a calendar of our events, additions to the library, and support group news. Please call KNRC to be added to our mailing list, or simply fill out the form below. The NeuroTransmitter is also available electronically and via our website.

Support Groups

KNRC offers a variety of support groups that provide both education and support. Talking with and learning from others who have similar challenges is often encouraging and beneficial to those living with a neurological disorder. Their caregivers and parents also benefit from participation in support groups.

Support groups typically meet every month.

Please note our new location:
Kadlec Healthplex
1268 Lee Blvd
Richland, WA 99352


ART EXPRESSIONS
2nd Tuesday of each month, at 10 a.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

ALZHEIMER'S/DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS
*Light Meal Served
3rd Thursday of each month, at 5:30 p.m. and/or
4th Tuesday of each month, at 5:30 p.m.
Location: Callaway Gardens

AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)
4th Wednesday of each month, at 12 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

CAREGIVERS
3rd Tuesday of each month, at 1 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

CAREGIVERS (For Men Only) *light meal served
4th Monday of each month, at 12:30 p.m.
Location: Callaway Gardens

CHRONIC FATIGUE IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME/FIBROMYALGIA 
This group is merged with the Chronic Pain Support Group and will meet twice a month, the 2nd and 4th Friday of every month.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

CHRONIC PAIN
This group is merged with the Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Fibromyalgia Support Group and will meet twice a month, the 2nd and 4th Friday of every month at 1:00 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
1st Tuesday of each month, at 2 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

PARKINSON'S DISEASE
3rd Monday of each month, at 1:30 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

PARKINSON'S DISEASE
4th Monday of each month, at 6:30 p.m.
Location: Brookdale Meadow Springs
770 West Gage, Richland

POST-POLIO
1st Wednesday of each month, at 1 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

SPINAL DISORDERS
4th Wednesday, meets quarterly at 10:30 a.m. (March, June, Sept., Dec.)
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

STROKE
3rd Tuesday of each month, at 3 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
1st Wednesday of each month, at 3 p.m.
Location: Kadlec Healthplex

Neurological Disorders

Useful Links

Recursos en Español (Spanish-Language Resources)

Caregivers

"There are only four kinds of people in this world—Those who have been caregivers, those who currently are caregivers, those who will be caregivers, those who will need caregivers.”

—Rosalynn Carter

Caregiving is among the most rewarding and most challenging undertakings of your life, and each and every scenario is different. Each person, and each progression of disease, is different. We have many helpful books, DVDs, and other informational materials, with everything from strategies for care to the personal stories of other care providers. Sometimes the most helpful thing you can hold in your heart is that another has walked that road before you, and you are not alone.

KNRC offer's FOUR Caregiver Support Groups:

  • Alzheimer's/Dementia Caregivers’ Support Group at Callaway Gardens on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 5:30pm
  • Alzheimer's/Dementia Caregivers’ Support Group at Callaway Gardens on the third Thursday of every month at 5:30pm.
  • Caregivers Support Group at KNRC, every 3rd Tuesday of the month, at 1:00pm.
  • Caregivers: For Men Only at Callaway Gardens, every fourth Monday of the month, at 12:30 pm.

Caregiver groups held at Callaway Gardens are requested to RSVP as a light meal is provided during the meeting.  Callaway Gardens is located at 5505 West Skagit Ct, Kennewick, WA 99336.  To RSVP, please call (509) 783-5433.

External resources:

  • 2014 Caregivers Program Booklet with Kari Berit, MS
  • 2013 Caregivers Program Booklet with Teepa Snow, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA
  • 2012 Caregivers Program Booklet with Wendy Lustbader, MSW

 

Resources

A unique resource, KNRC is the only community-based center in North America dedicated to education on a vast array of neurological disorders. Click below to see some of our specific resources.

Caregivers:
Resources, library materials, and support specifically attended for family and caregivers

Neurological Disorders:
A list of all disorders currently served by KNRC, with links to relevant local and external resources.

Don't see something you need? Please call us--we'll do our best to help.

Additional Resources:
Links to videos, articles, further organizations, and other relevant information for those with neurological disorders and their friends and families.

Neurological Resource Center

Kadlec Neurological Resource Center provides compassion, education, and support to those affected by neurological disorders, and to their caregivers, so they don't have to face the challenges of a neurological disorder alone.

Don't miss the current news in health!  Read Health Day News here.

Sign-up for our Newsletter